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Auckland

New Zealand Mortgage Loans

Mortgage Home Loan

How the process works

1

First Chat

We get to know you, and ensure you know what we do and how we do it. We’ll talk about what you are trying to do, your goals and ambitions.
2

Understand your Situation

We gather information from you including personal details, income and assets and other financial information.
3

Research

We research the market to ensure we find the best option for you.
4

Lodge your Application

We work with you and the lender, and do the legwork to get you approved.
5

Approval and Recommendation

We customise the loan structure and discuss interest rate options.
6

Settlement Process

We work with you, your lawyer and the lender to ensure a smooth settlement process.
7

Keep in Touch

We keep in regular contact to check in and review any changes to your situation.

Interested in moving to Auckland?

All about Auckland

Auckland is a large metropolitan city in the North Island of New Zealand. The most populous urban area in the country, Auckland has an urban population of about 1,463,000 (June 2021). It is located in the Auckland Region—the area governed by Auckland Council—which includes outlying rural areas and the islands of the Hauraki Gulf, and which has a total population of 1,715,600. While Europeans continue to make up the plurality of Auckland’s population, the city became multicultural and cosmopolitan in the late-20th century, with Asians accounting for 31% of the city’s population in 2018. Auckland is also home to the largest Polynesian population in the world. The Māori-language name for Auckland is Tāmaki Makaurau, meaning “Tāmaki desired by many”, in reference to the desirability of its natural resources and geography.

Auckland lies between the Hauraki Gulf to the east, the Hunua Ranges to the south-east, the Manukau Harbour to the south-west, and the Waitākere Ranges and smaller ranges to the west and north-west. The surrounding hills are covered in rainforest and the landscape is dotted with 53 volcanic centres that make up the Auckland Volcanic Field. The central part of the urban area occupies a narrow isthmus between the Manukau Harbour on the Tasman Sea and the Waitematā Harbour on the Pacific Ocean. Auckland is one of the few cities in the world to have a harbour on each of two separate major bodies of water.

The isthmus on which Auckland sits was first settled c. 1350 and was valued for its rich and fertile land. The Māori population in the area is estimated to have peaked at 20,000 before the arrival of Europeans. After a British colony was established in New Zealand in 1840, William Hobson, then Lieutenant-Governor of New Zealand, chose Auckland as its new capital. He named the area for George Eden, Earl of Auckland, British First Lord of the Admiralty. Māori–European conflict over land in the region led to war in the mid-19th century. In 1865, Auckland was replaced by Wellington as the capital, but continued to grow, initially because of its port and the logging and gold-mining activities in its hinterland, and later because of pastoral farming (especially dairy farming) in the surrounding area, and manufacturing in the city itself. It has been the nation’s largest city throughout most of its history. Today, Auckland’s central business district is New Zealand’s leading economic hub.

The University of Auckland, founded in 1883, is the largest university in New Zealand. The city’s significant tourist attractions include national historic sites, festivals, performing arts, sports activities, and a variety of cultural institutions, such as the Auckland War Memorial Museum, the Museum of Transport and Technology, and the Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki. Its architectural landmarks include the Harbour Bridge, the Town Hall, the Ferry Building and the Sky Tower. The city is served by Auckland Airport, which handles around 2 million international passengers a month. Despite being one of the most expensive cities in the world, Auckland is recognised as one of the world’s most liveable cities, ranking third in the 2019 Mercer Quality of Living Survey and at first place in a 2021 ranking of the global liveability index by The Economist.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auckland

Purchasing Property in Auckland?

Early Auckland History

The isthmus was settled by Māori circa 1350, and was valued for its rich and fertile land. Many (fortified villages) were created, mainly on the volcanic peaks. By the early 1700s, Te Waiohua, a confederation of tribes such as Ngā Oho, Ngā Riki and Ngā Iwi, became the main influential force on the Auckland isthmus, with major located at Maungakiekie / One Tree Hill, Māngere Mountain and MaungataketakeThe confederation came to an end around 1741, when paramount chief Kiwi Tāmaki was killed in battle by Ngāti Whātua hapū Te Taoū chief Te Waha-akiaki. From the 1740s onwards, Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei became the major influential force on the Auckland isthmus. The Māori population in the area is estimated to have been about 20,000 before the arrival of Europeans. The introduction of firearms at the end of the eighteenth century, which began in Northland, upset the balance of power and led to devastating intertribal warfare beginning in 1807, causing iwi who lacked the new weapons to seek refuge in areas less exposed to coastal raids. As a result, the region had relatively low numbers of Māori when settlement by European New Zealanders began.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auckland

Auckland First Home Buyer?

Modern History of Auckland

Trams and railway lines shaped Auckland’s rapid expansion in the early first half of the 20th century. However, after the Second World War the city’s transport system and urban form became increasingly dominated by the motor vehicle. Arterial roads and motorways became both defining and geographically dividing features of the urban landscape. They also allowed further massive expansion that resulted in the growth of suburban areas such as the North Shore (especially after the construction of the Auckland Harbour Bridge in the late 1950s), and Manukau City in the south.

Economic deregulation in the mid-1980s led to very dramatic changes to Auckland’s economy and many companies relocated their head offices from Wellington to Auckland. The region was now the nerve centre of the entire national economy. Auckland also benefited from a surge in tourism, which brought 75 percent of New Zealand’s international visitors through its airport. Auckland’s port handled 31 percent of the country’s container trade in 2015.

The face of urban Auckland changed when the government’s immigration policy began allowing immigrants from Asia in 1986. This has led to Auckland becoming a multi-cultural city, with people of all ethnic backgrounds. According to the 1961 census data, Māori and Pacific Islanders comprised 5 percent of Auckland’s population; Asians less than 1 percent. By 2006 the Asian population had reached 18.0 percent in Auckland, and 36.2 percent in the central city. New arrivals from Hong Kong, Taiwan and Korea gave a distinctive character to the areas where they clustered, while a range of other immigrants introduced mosques, Hindu temples, halal butchers and ethnic restaurants to the suburbs.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auckland

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Investment Properties in Auckland?

Geography of Auckland

The boundaries of Auckland are imprecisely defined. The Auckland urban area, as it is defined by Statistics New Zealand under the Statistical Standard for Geographic Areas 2018 (SSGA18), spans 607.07 square kilometres (234.39 sq mi) and extends to Long Bay in the north, Swanson in the north-west, and Runciman in the south. Auckland’s functional urban area (commuting zone) extends from just south of Warkworth in the north to Meremere in the south, incorporating the Hibiscus Coast in the northeast, Helensville, Parakai, Muriwai, Waimauku, KumeuHuapai, and Riverhead in the northwest, Beachlands-Pine Harbour and Maraetai in the east, and Pukekohe, Clarks Beach, Patumāhoe, Waiuku, Tuakau and Pōkeno (the latter two in the Waikato region) in the south. Auckland forms New Zealand’s largest urban area.

The Auckland urban area lies within the Auckland Region, an administrative region that takes its name from the city. The region encompasses the city centre, as well as suburbs, surrounding towns, nearshore islands, and rural areas north and south of the urban area.

The Auckland central business district (CBD)—the city centre—is the most built-up area of the region. The CBD covers 433 hectares (1,070 acres) in a triangular area, and is bounded by the Auckland waterfront on the Waitematā Harbou and the inner-city suburbs of Ponsonby, Newton and Parnell.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auckland

Auckland Mortgage Financing

Climate in Auckland

Under the Köppen climate classification, Auckland has an oceanic climate (Köppen climate classification Cfb), while according to the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), its climate is classified as subtropical with warm humid summers and mild damp winters. It is the warmest main centre of New Zealand and is also one of the sunniest, with an average of 2,003.1 sunshine hours per annum. The average daily maximum temperature is 23.7 °C (74.7 °F) in February and 14.7 °C (58.5 °F) in July. The maximum recorded temperature is 34.4 °C (93.9 °F) on 12 February 2009, while the minimum is −3.9 °C (25.0 °F), although there is also an unofficial low of −5.7 °C (21.7 °F) recorded at Riverhead Forest in June 1936. Snowfall is extremely rare: the most significant fall since the start of the 20th century was on 27 July 1939, when snow stuck to the clothes of people outdoors just before dawn and five centimetres (2 in) of snow reportedly lay on Mount EdenSnowflakes were also seen on 28 July 1930 and 15 August 2011. The early morning calm on the isthmus during settled weather, before the sea breeze rises, was described as early as 1853: “In all seasons, the beauty of the day is in the early morning. At that time, generally, a solemn stillness holds, and a perfect calm prevails…”.

Auckland occasionally suffers from air pollution due to fine particle emissions. There are also occasional breaches of guideline levels of carbon monoxide. While maritime winds normally disperse the pollution relatively quickly it can sometimes become visible as smog, especially on calm winter days.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auckland

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Financing we can help with

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Building a home

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Refinancing your mortgage

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Loan refixes & rollovers

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Renovations

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International Buyers

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Bridging finance

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Equity release

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Business loans

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Commercial property loans

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Property development funding

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Car & Equipment Financing

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Why work with us

We are owner operated and not aligned with any lenders

We work with you to customise your loan so it best matches your goals, and to save you time and money.

01

We have extensive experience

We all have over 10 years’ experience in banking and we understand the industry. We specialise in both residential and commercial financial advice.

02

We build relationships

We pride ourselves on building relationships with our customers and with our lenders to provide a more customised and personal experience.

03

Why work with us

We are owner-operated and are not aligned with any lenders

01

We have extensive experience in residential and commercial finance

02

We build relationships to provide a more customised and personal experience

03

Some of the banks & lenders we work with:

Custom Mortgages Lending Partners

Correct as of April 2024

Custom Mortgages

Custom Mortgages is run by a group of mates – all bankers and each with many years experience in the industry. The team understands and knows the commercial, mortgage, and housing landscapes. With this experience, they can help you find a tailored, custom solution.

No two purchases, projects or businesses are the same, so why should your financing arrangements be?

Contact UsBook a MeetingApply Now
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Custom Mortgages

Custom Mortgages is run by a group of mates – all bankers and each with many years experience in the industry. The team understands and knows the commercial, mortgage, and housing landscapes. With this experience, they can help you find a tailored, custom solution.

No two purchases, projects or businesses are the same, so why should your financing arrangements be?

Contact UsApply Now
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Book a Meeting