Skip to main content

United Kingdom Moving to New Zealand?

All About New Zealand Mortgage Loans

Every mortgage scenario is unique, so schedule a call with us to get a customized mortgage loan proposal. We are experts in working with immigrants from the United Kingdom moving to New Zealand and would love to see how we can help you plan your move!

Mortgage Home Loan

How the process works

1

First Chat

We get to know you, and ensure you know what we do and how we do it. We’ll talk about what you are trying to do, your goals and ambitions.
2

Understand your Situation

We gather information from you including personal details, income and assets and other financial information.
3

Research

We research the market to ensure we find the best option for you.
4

Lodge your Application

We work with you and the lender, and do the legwork to get you approved.
5

Approval and Recommendation

We customise the loan structure and discuss interest rate options.
6

Settlement Process

We work with you, your lawyer and the lender to ensure a smooth settlement process.
7

Keep in Touch

We keep in regular contact to check in and review any changes to your situation.

Interested in moving from the United Kingdom to New Zealand?

All about New Zealand

New Zealand is an island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. It consists of two main landmasses—the North Island (Te Ika-a-Māui) and the South Island (Te Waipounamu)—and over 700 smaller islands, covering a total area of 268,021 square kilometres (103,500 sq mi). New Zealand is about 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) east of Australia across the Tasman Sea and 1,000 kilometres (600 mi) south of the islands of New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga. The country’s varied topography and sharp mountain peaks, including the Southern Alps, owe much to tectonic uplift and volcanic eruptions. New Zealand’s capital city is Wellington, and its most populous city is Auckland.

Owing to their remoteness, the islands of New Zealand were the last large habitable landmass to be settled by humans. Between about 1280 and 1350, Polynesiansbegan to settle in the islands and then developed a distinctive Māori culture. In 1642, the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman became the first European to sight and record New Zealand. In 1840, representatives of the United Kingdom and Māori chiefs signed the Treaty of Waitangi, which declared British sovereignty over the islands. In 1841, New Zealand became a colony within the British Empire, and in 1907 it became a dominion; it gained full statutory independence in 1947, and the British monarch remained the head of state. Today, the majority of New Zealand’s population of 5 million is of European descent; the indigenous Māori are the largest minority, followed by Asians and Pacific Islanders. Reflecting this, New Zealand’s culture is mainly derived from Māori and early British settlers, with recent broadening of culture arising from increased immigration. The official languages are Māori and New Zealand Sign Language, with English being dominant and a de facto official language.

A developed country, New Zealand ranks highly in international comparisons of national performance, such as quality of life, education, protection of civil liberties, government transparency, and economic freedom. New Zealand underwent major economic changes during the 1980s, which transformed it from a protectionist to a liberalised free-trade economy. The service sector dominates the national economy, followed by the industrial sector, and agriculture. International tourism is also a significant source of revenue. Nationally, legislative authority is vested in an elected, unicameral Parliament, while executive political power is exercised by the Cabinet, led by the prime minister, currently Jacinda Ardern. Queen Elizabeth II is the country’s monarch and is represented by the governor-general. In addition, New Zealand is organised into 11 regional councils and 67 territorial authorities for local government purposes. The Realm of New Zealand also includes Tokelau (a dependent territory); the Cook Islands and Niue (self-governing states in free association with New Zealand); and the Ross Dependency, which is New Zealand’s territorial claim in Antarctica.

New Zealand is a member of the United Nations, Commonwealth of Nations, ANZUS, OECD, ASEAN Plus Six, Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, the Pacific Community and the Pacific Islands Forum.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Zealand

Purchasing Property in New Zealand from the United Kingdom?

Ethnicity and immigration in New Zealand

In the 2018 census, 71.8% of New Zealand residents identified ethnically as European, and 16.5% as Māori. Other major ethnic groups include Asian (15.3%) and Pacific peoples (9.0%), two-thirds of whom live in the Auckland Region. The population has become more multicultural and diverse in recent decades: in 1961, the census reported that the population of New Zealand was 92% European and 7% Māori, with Asian and Pacific minorities sharing the remaining 1%.

While the demonym for a New Zealand citizen is New Zealander, the informal “Kiwi” is commonly used both internationally and by locals. The Māori loanword Pākehā has been used to refer to New Zealanders of European descent, although some reject this name. The word today is increasingly used to refer to all non-Polynesian New Zealanders.

The Māori were the first people to reach New Zealand, followed by the early European settlers. Following colonisation, immigrants were predominantly from Britain, Ireland and Australia because of restrictive policies similar to the White Australia policy. There was also significant Dutch, Dalmatian, German, and Italian immigration, together with indirect European immigration through Australia, North America, South America and South Africa. Net migration increased after the Second World War; in the 1970s and 1980s policies on immigration were relaxed, and immigration from Asia was promoted. In 2009–10, an annual target of 45,000–50,000 permanent residence approvals was set by the New Zealand Immigration Service—more than one new migrant for every 100 New Zealand residents. In the 2018 census, 27.4% of people counted were not born in New Zealand, up from 25.2% in the 2013 census. Over half (52.4%) of New Zealand’s overseas-born population lives in the Auckland Region. The United Kingdom remains the largest source of New Zealand’s immigrant population, with around a quarter of all overseas-born New Zealanders born there; other major sources of New Zealand’s overseas-born population are China, India, Australia, South Africa, Fijiand Samoa. The number of fee-paying international students increased sharply in the late 1990s, with more than 20,000 studying in public tertiary institutions in 2002.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Zealand

The United Kingdom to New Zealand First Home Buyer?

New Zealand’s Economy

New Zealand has an advanced market economyranked 14th in the 2019 Human Development Index and third in the 2020 Index of Economic Freedom. It is a high-income economy with a nominal gross domestic product (GDP) per capita of US$36,254. The currency is the New Zealand dollar, informally known as the “Kiwi dollar”; it also circulates in the Cook Islands (see Cook Islands dollar), Niue, Tokelau, and the Pitcairn Islands.

Historically, extractive industries have contributed strongly to New Zealand’s economy, focusing at different times on sealing, whaling, flax, gold, kauri gum, and native timber. The first shipment of refrigerated meat on the Dunedin in 1882 led to the establishment of meat and dairy exports to Britain, a trade which provided the basis for strong economic growth in New Zealand. High demand for agricultural products from the United Kingdom and the United States helped New Zealanders achieve higher living standards than both Australia and Western Europe in the 1950s and 1960s. In 1973, New Zealand’s export market was reduced when the United Kingdom joined the European Economic Community and other compounding factors, such as the 1973 oil and 1979 energy crises, led to a severe economic depression. Living standards in New Zealand fell behind those of Australia and Western Europe, and by 1982 New Zealand had the lowest per-capita income of all the developed nations surveyed by the World Bank. In the mid-1980s New Zealand deregulated its agricultural sector by phasing out subsidies over a three-year period. Since 1984, successive governments engaged in major macroeconomic restructuring (known first as Rogernomics and then Ruthanasia), rapidly transforming New Zealand from a protectionist and highly regulated economy to a liberalised free-trade economy.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Zealand

New Zealand Image Gallery

The United Kingdom Buying Investment Properties in New Zealand?

 Local Government in New Zealand

The early European settlers divided New Zealand into provinces, which had a degree of autonomy. Because of financial pressures and the desire to consolidate railways, education, land sales, and other policies, government was centralised and the provinces were abolished in 1876. The provinces are remembered in regional public holidays and sporting rivalries.

Since 1876, various councils have administered local areas under legislation determined by the central government. In 1989, the government reorganised local government into the current two-tier structure of regional councils and territorial authorities. The 249 municipalities that existed in 1975 have now been consolidated into 67 territorial authorities and 11 regional councils. The regional councils’ role is to regulate “the natural environment with particular emphasis on resource management“, while territorial authorities are responsible for sewage, water, local roads, building consents, and other local matters. Five of the territorial councils are unitary authorities and also act as regional councils. The territorial authorities consist of 13 city councils, 53 district councils, and the Chatham IslandsCouncil. While officially the Chatham Islands Council is not a unitary authority, it undertakes many functions of a regional council.

The Realm of New Zealand, one of 15 Commonwealth realms, is the entire area over which the queen of New Zealand is sovereign and comprises New Zealand, Tokelau, the Ross Dependency, the Cook Islands, and Niue. The Cook Islands and Niue are self-governing states in free association with New Zealand. The New Zealand Parliament cannot pass legislation for these countries, but with their consent can act on behalf of them in foreign affairs and defence. Tokelau is classified as a non-self-governing territory, but is administered by a council of three elders (one from each Tokelauan atoll). The Ross Dependency is New Zealand’s territorial claim in Antarctica, where it operates the Scott Base research facility. New Zealand nationality law treats all parts of the realm equally, so most people born in New Zealand, the Cook Islands, Niue, Tokelau, and the Ross Dependency are New Zealand citizens.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Zealand

The United Kingdom to New Zealand Mortgage Financing

Trade in New Zealand

New Zealand is heavily dependent on international trade, particularly in agricultural products. Exports account for 24% of its output, making New Zealand vulnerable to international commodity prices and global economic slowdowns. Food products made up 55% of the value of all the country’s exports in 2014; wood was the second largest earner (7%). New Zealand’s main trading partners, as at June 2018, are China (NZ$27.8b), Australia ($26.2b), the European Union ($22.9b), the United States ($17.6b), and Japan ($8.4b).[240] On 7 April 2008, New Zealand and China signed the New Zealand–China Free Trade Agreement, the first such agreement China has signed with a developed country. The service sector is the largest sector in the economy, followed by manufacturing and construction and then farming and raw material extraction. Tourism plays a significant role in the economy, contributing $12.9 billion (or 5.6%) to New Zealand’s total GDP and supporting 7.5% of the total workforce in 2016. In 2017, international visitor arrivals were expected to increase at a rate of 5.4% annually up to 2022.

Wool was New Zealand’s major agricultural export during the late 19th century. Even as late as the 1960s it made up over a third of all export revenues, but since then its price has steadily dropped relative to other commodities, and wool is no longer profitable for many farmers. In contrast, dairy farming increased, with the number of dairy cows doubling between 1990 and 2007, to become New Zealand’s largest export earner. In the year to June 2018, dairy products accounted for 17.7% ($14.1 billion) of total exports, and the country’s largest company, Fonterra, controls almost one-third of the international dairy trade. Other exports in 2017-18 were meat (8.8%), wood and wood products (6.2%), fruit (3.6%), machinery (2.2%) and wine (2.1%). New Zealand’s wine industry has followed a similar trend to dairy, the number of vineyards doubling over the same period, overtaking wool exports for the first time in 2007.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Zealand

SCHEDULE A CALL WITH US TO VIEW MORTGAGE OPTIONS

Financing we can help with

First home buyers

Click to learn more!

Investment property

Click to learn more!

Building a home

Click to learn more!

Refinancing your mortgage

Click to learn more!

Loan refixes & rollovers

Click to learn more!

Renovations

Click to learn more!

International Buyers

Click to learn more!

Bridging finance

Click to learn more!

Equity release

Click to learn more!

Business loans

Click to learn more!

Commercial property loans

Click to learn more!

Property development funding

Click to learn more!

Car & Equipment Financing

Click to learn more!

Why work with us

We are owner operated and not aligned with any lenders

We work with you to customise your loan so it best matches your goals, and to save you time and money.

01

We have extensive experience

We all have over 10 years’ experience in banking and we understand the industry. We specialise in both residential and commercial financial advice.

02

We build relationships

We pride ourselves on building relationships with our customers and with our lenders to provide a more customised and personal experience.

03

Why work with us

We are owner-operated and are not aligned with any lenders

01

We have extensive experience in residential and commercial finance

02

We build relationships to provide a more customised and personal experience

03

Some of the banks & lenders we work with:

Custom Mortgages Lending Partners

Correct as of May 2023

Custom Mortgages

Custom Mortgages is run by seven Central Otago mates – all bankers and each with over 10 years experience in the industry. The team understands and knows the local commercial, mortgage, and housing landscapes. With this experience, they can help you find a tailored, custom solution.

No two purchases, projects or businesses are the same, so why should your financing arrangements be?

Contact UsBook a MeetingApply Now
GoogleFacebook

Custom Mortgages

Custom Mortgages is run by seven Central Otago mates – all bankers and each with over 10 years experience in the industry. The team understands and knows the local commercial, mortgage, and housing landscapes. With this experience, they can help you find a tailored, custom solution.

No two purchases, projects or businesses are the same, so why should your financing arrangements be?

Contact UsApply Now
GoogleFacebook
Book a Meeting